Tagsex work

Pumping Rikochan’s Clit, Part II: Sex Workers’ Rights

Tongue-tip to clit

Slutty Nic, tickling my clitty with the tip of her tongue…made me absolutely crazy! I thought I my knees would buckle!

“If you don’t love me at my tweeting about sex workers’ rights, you don’t deserve me at my nudes.”

I’m interrupting my normal sexy chat to talk a little bit about sex workers’ rights, sex workers’ safety, and the right to post and consume porn online–all of which are at risk right now, thanks to the terrible new FOSTA/SESTA law. So, yes, enjoy this second set of pictures of me having an amazing time playing with Slutty Nic. But also read the post and think about what you’re willing to do to protect your right to actually see enjoy my porn. Are you willing to stand up for sex workers’ rights? Because that’s what it will take to keep sex workers safe, and to keep sites like Rikochanpornstar online.

Who Is a Sex Worker?

The fact that that is one of my most popular tweets–even more than most of my nudest of nudes–makes me happy and a tiny bit proud, because sex workers’ rights are incredibly important. I’m a sex worker, and I’m standing up for myself and all the people who do the kinds of things I do, whether it’s full service sex work/escorting, stripping, wrestling/sessioning that crosses over in sex work (not all of it does), web-camming, fin-domming, domination, sugar-babying, old-school feature-film porn, or just plain clips and pics porn, like I make.

Slutty Nic looks at sex workers Rikochan's Pumped Clit

Lots of gorgeous things to look at in this shot, amirite?

In fact, even burlesque dancers figure into this, as far as I am concerned, although some of them don’t consider themselves sex workers. Still, given the number of laws there are regulating what they can’t and can’t do with their bodies and what the can’ and can’t show of their bodies on stage tells me that, in terms of rights, at least, they count.

I’m a Sex Worker

I consider myself a sex worker. I make money from being (hopefully) sexy in front of cameras and video cameras. I have sex (by myself and with other people) on camera, and I sell the clips, at least, for money. I’m a sex worker, and I work for myself, and I enjoy it, and I’m proud of the work that I do and I’m proud of the pleasure and enjoyment it brings to my small but dedicated (and awesome!) group of fans and friends.

To be clear, I’m a sex worker, but I’m not a *full-service* sex worker. No one pays me to have sex with them. I don’t do any in-person services, but that’s not because I look down on that part of sex work or the people who do it. Far from it: I think that is an amazing profession that I’m sure provides true help, relief and human connection to a lot of people and satisfies and entertains many more. Some of the people that I’m proudest to call my friend do this kind of work. I’m only clarifying here because I don’t want to be claiming authority I don’t deserve.

Pumped Clit Pics

Nic couldn’t believe how long my big clit got in the tube!

Me, I’m too shy to do it. Part of it is my English, which doesn’t sound nearly as good in person, without someone to correct my grammar (yes, I have a couple people who help me fix all the mistakes in most of what I write). Mostly, though, I’m so shy and awkward in person, I haven’t even been able to do camming yet, although I do have an account on MusclegirlzLive.

But I’ve written about all that before. The point here, and the point that is new (and bad) is that there are laws out there now that are attacking sex workers under the pretense of stopping human trafficking. Look, I agree that trafficking is bad, but the idea that all sex workers are trafficked is just ridiculous, and the idea that laws like SESTA/FOSTA help trafficked people is just plain stupid. FOSTA/SESTA hurts sex workers.

Shutting Down Backpage Hurts Sex Workers

All these laws do is make life far, far worse for sex workers, by forcing the closure of *sites like Backpage that make sex workers safer*. That’s right: the internet made life safer for sex workers by making it easier for them to contact, advertise, and screen for clients without an intermediary (that is, a pimp). For sex workers with access to the internet, at least, backpage and other services like bad client lists and so on, make sex workers safer.

Riko's fat clit

The tube got a little foggy, but this is still a pretty nice shot of my clit, right?

Backpage and sites like it helped sex workers work without pimps, helped them avoid dangerous clients, and helped them do their jobs without needing to walk the streets. I’m not saying that it made everything great, or that everyone had the resources to use it, or even that everyone who used it escaped all the bad aspects of sex work. But bringing sex work online was a huge harm reduction, and that’s a good thing. FOSTA/SESTA jeopardizes all online sex work.

What about trafficking? Well, for one thing, despite all the headlines, Backpage’s founders weren’t hit with any federal trafficking charges. Instead, their federal charges and pleas all have to do with prostitution–sex work. And sex work and trafficking are not at all the same thing, as much as the rescue industry would like to pretend they are. These new laws are erasing all the progress that the internet brought to sex work, which was their goal all along. While many tragically duped people may actually believe that these laws are “rescuing” people, that couldn’t be any farther from the truth. The people who really pushed these laws did so for two reasons.

Big Clit Licking

One of my favorite clit-licking shots (of me) ever. Such a pretty girl, such a big clit!

Who’s Really Behind the Anti-Trafficking Movement?

The first group are the Moral Majority types who want to criminalize all sex work (and not just the full-service kind). These are the fundamentalists and the people who want to control sexuality–and especially women’s sexuality. These are the religious zealots and the subset of feminists who think that anyone who does sex work is a victim. Note: it’s a subset of radical feminists who are against sex work–there are many who think women are fully human being who ought to be able to choose for themselves what they do with their bodies.

The second group are in some way even more disgusting: the people (even including some most supposedly liberal politicians, like Bernie Sanders Kamala Harris), who do it for the soundbites, to advance their careers, despite the fact that sex workers have begged, literally begged them not to pass these laws.

Why Should YOU Care About Sex Workers’ Rights?

If you’re a patron of full service sex work, the answer is obvious. Your provider will be harder to reach, may have to charge more to make up for lost income and time, and may, in fact, be killed in the new climate.

Giant clit hood pulled back

She was AMAZED when I pulled the hood back on my giant clit

Even if you’re not a patron of full-service sex work, however, you ought to be very, very worried. You, as a consumer of porn (I’m making the leap that everyone who visits my site regularly is *mostly* here for the porn, even if they also enjoy my writing), ought to be terrified. The same weird coalition of religious zealots and radfems are already pushing to use the same strategy, with the same dupes leading the charge for them, against all sorts of pornography.

We’re already seeing the same arguments that women in porn are exploited and trafficked, and all it takes is a little bit of panic and the hint of legal action to get the wheels rolling and to get scared companies to start shutting down sites and stop processing cards and deleting porn from social networks like Tumblr and Twitter. It really wouldn’t take much for a waves of shutdowns to completely change the face of online porn. My site, and all the pictures on it and the sites that host my clips–all of that could disappear overnight if the people who pushed FOSTA/SESTA get their way.

Women with big clit

That’s it, lick all the way around the glans of my swollen clitoris…

What Can You Do to Help Sex Workers and Protect Porn?

So if you want to keep watching porn and you live in the US, please, please, please contact your congresspeople and tell them you are against censorship, and that you think FOSTA/SESTA is a bad bill and should be repealed. Beg them to stand up for free speech and not to be duped by the trafficking argument, please? Speak up when people say stupid things about porn, sex work, strippers, and so on.

The other thing you can do no matter where you live is to educate yourself and help educate others about the truths surrounding sex work. It’s not all fun and games, but then no job is. And, once you separate the panic from the reality, that’s what it is: a job. It can some times be amazing and rewarding, and sometimes be shitty and oppressive, like any job. For the most part, though, it’s the ignorance, panic, and shaming of the “rescue” crowd that makes sex work worse than it has to be, and that misinforms the mainstream, most of whom probably honestly believe that they’re helping when they support the banning of sites like Backpage.

Three excellent books about the realities of sex work and trafficking are Sex, Lies, & Statistics, the truth about sex work the mainstream press, politicians, and Julie Bindel don’t want you to know, by Dr. Brooke Magnanti; Sex at the Margins, Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry, by Dr. Laura Agustin; and Thriving in Sex Work: Heartfelt Advice for Staying Sane in the Sex Industry, by Lola Davina. I’ve read all three, and they’re amazing, informed works by women who’ve actually done the research and listened to sex workers (in some cases also actually doing the work themselves) and have a useful perspective on the subject.

To be clear, I’m not and expert on this subject, these incredible women are. I’m learning from them, and you can too.

Rikochan the Sex Worker

Rikochan in lingerie

A favorite recent lingerie purchase. If it looks a bit arty, does that mean it isn’t porn?

I never set out to be a sex worker, but I became one all the same. I didn’t even realize it until long after the fact. What do I mean? Well, let me explain.

I make porn. I sell clips of myself (and other people) having sex. To promote those clips, I write an adult blog and share lots of nude pictures of myself. The thing is, I never used to think of what I do in those terms—production, sales, and promotion—because I’m fortunate enough that I never needed to, because I don’t rely exclusively on porn for my living. I just never had to think about what I do in that way. I usually tend think of my porn as my secret art project, my hobby, my guilty (in a good way) secret, my life-saving outlet. And those things are all true. But it’s also sex work, what I do. I’m a sex worker.

Sex Worker Rikochan's hard nipples

I love the way my nipples look in this white mesh. And, judging by clip sales, so do a lot of my fans!

Just a Blogger Who…Writes About Sex…and Makes Porn Clips…and…

Conversationally, I would normally describe myself as a blogger who also happens to makes adult clips. The way I usually think about it, the blogging comes first, then the photos, and the clips pay for all the hosting and gear, with a little bit left over, which I usually reinvest into the process. In pure work terms, however, it’s the opposite. I’m a clip producer who builds community with her blog and pictures.

As I learn more about sex work and sex workers, I have come to understand that, to the extent that I make, sell, and promote porn, I’m a sex worker. What I do is most definitely work, and it’s most definitely work about sex.

Sex worker nipple hard on

My nipples are basically always erect, and especially after pumping.

Forums: My Gateway Drug

Just as I didn’t set out to be a sex worker, I didn’t set out to make porn, either. I was just looking for some people like me, for a feeling of community, and for some advice for discovering a sex life I could enjoy. At the time, that mostly meant forums. Eventually, I just started sharing pictures on forums that inspired me, as way to contribute to the community and, ideally to pay forward the incredible gift of sexuality and education I was receiving.

From there it went to sharing little clips, and then doing a little writing, and then starting my own blog, and then setting up a little clip store, and then buying my own real equipment and then, finally expanding my pool of people I worked with beyond solo clips and clips with my boyfriend.

I think that, even more than getting paid a bit for a clip or two, the first time work with people you’re not in a relationship with is the classic divider between hobbyist and performer.

Session girls are sex workers

Putting on some size; maybe someday I’ll be an FBB session girl. Also: Porn!

What Even Is Porn Now?

And so suddenly, I’m a porn producer. I mean, I’ve never made “big-budget” studio porn, and I’ve barely done any boy-girl shooting at all, but I’ve made close to 100 adult clips and I’ve posted thousands of erotic-or just plain pornographic-pictures online over the years. I’ve got a hundreds of posts on my blog, probably adding up to over 100,000 words, a blog that has had millions of views over the years.

These days, that’s increasingly what porn is, I think. The days when you weren’t really in porn unless you had a contract with Vivid or something like that are long gone, that’s for sure. I’m not dragging the people who make or made that kind of studio porn. But the fact is, the vast majority of the porn that I see people consuming these days get made by people like me. People who started small and built up their own teeny-tiny porn empires.

The thing is, though, because of the way I just sort of slipped into it, and especially because I do it anonymously, I never really thought too much about the implications in the way that you might if you went from nothing to having your face showed up on DVD covers in shops around the world overnight.

Fat Pumped Clit

Ugh, that feels so damned good…

Baby You’re Star

I always used to think that sex work meant prostitution, and I told myself, I’m not doing that. Not that I looked down on prostitutes—not at all. I only know a few in person, but the ones I know are bold and clever and brave. The same is largely true of the ones that I know online, too. I’ve never been against the idea of sex work or sex workers. I just didn’t consider myself one of them, didn’t consider myself to be like them—whatever that means. I didn’t consider myself a “real” pornstar, anymore than I was prostitute or a stripper or a camgirl or any other kind of sex worker.

In fact, my site’s name, Rikochanpornstar, was originally meant to be a kind of self-deprecating humor, a joke at my own expense. As if I could really be a pornstar! Not! In my mind, it was a way of acknowledging that I wasn’t really pornstar material, but I suspect it was also a joking way of separating myself from sex work. Why?

I always thought I was outside the world of porn and the stigma that’s attached to it, since I never had to suffer it. I thought that by existing on the margins of sex industry the way I do, I could somehow not become a part of it, but that’s magical thinking. I felt that I was something else, and I also secretly felt guilty that I had what I perceived as the benefits of sex worth, without any of the cost.

Rikochan's Giant Clit

This is why I pump. To feel and look like this.

Secrets Are Stigma

But then someone asked me recently why if I love my porn so much, I it anonymously, and I realized, I am affected by the stigma. That’s why I hide this incredibly important part of my life away and separate it from my daily life. I do it because I know that that stigma is just hanging over me, looming but at bay…for now. And that’s because no matter what I think of what I do and why I do it, at base I am also a sex worker, and the world at large despises and is deeply afraid of sex workers. When I started to be honest with myself, I realize that it’s exhausting and frightening to be something that society hates so much, even if you’re only living at the fringes of it.

Whereas my alter ego used to be a gleeful secret that separated me from other people, with that feeling of “I know something you don’t know, and knowledge is power,” now I suddenly had a new and altogether different feeling, too. Whereas before I was different from other people because of what I knew, and that secret made me powerful and happy, now I was also different from other people because of what I was, and that secret kept me safe.

I hadn’t really changed, of course. But my understanding of myself and how the world would see me had. I still do what I do for the same reasons: because I want to, because I enjoy it, and because it fills parts of me that would otherwise be empty. Yes, for all those reasons. All those reasons that are sort of almost nearly socially acceptable. Right? I mean, this is the language of creativity and art, and, well, I could argue that because I do what I do for those reasons, what I do is erotica, not porn. Not sex work.

But I’m not just doing it for those reasons.

Rikochan's long clitoris

I never would have believed I could build a whole business around my clitty…

Business Is Business

I’m also doing it to sell clips. Not because I need to, economically; this isn’t survival work for me. Rather, it’s because because I am good at it, and it’s very satisfying to make something and sell it. Business is very satisfying. Success at making and selling things is satisfying. That is not to say that doing sex work for survival is a terrible thing. It’s a great luxury I have, that I don’t need to do it, and that I love it; many people choose to do sex work to stay alive and many I’m sure, wouldn’t do it if they had some other opportunity. I understand. That’s the reality of work, sexual or otherwise. The stress of the job I do stay afloat was quite literally killing me before I found the outlets of exercise and sex work. It’s still taking years off my life, I’m sure.

Because I hate my straight work so much, I was desperate for this new thing not to be work. Yes, I used to tell myself that because I plowed nearly all the profits back into the production of my clips it wasn’t really a job, it was a hobby, or maybe a collaborative, crowdsourced art project. Sure, that might be true. But it’s also work. I like sell porn, because I like knowing that people enjoy my work so much that they are willing to pay me for the pleasure of jerking off to it.

If I’m being honest with myself, the fact that I am able to be successful at it adds a whole extra level of satisfaction to the pleasure I always let myself understand I was getting, that of exhibitionism, pleasing myself and other people, educating people, and broadening the world of porn to include people that look and think like me. All those pleasures are still there, but I’m also letting myself understand that this is work, and work that I enjoy for the sake of the work itself. I always enjoyed the sex part of being a sex worker; I just never realized until recently that I also enjoy the work part of being a sex worker.

Sexy muscle

A Sex Worker Are Workers; Sex Work Is Work

I don’t have particularly clever conclusion about about the meaning of sex work or the hypocrisy of society’s attitude toward sex workers. It’s clear to me that sex work is work; it’s the moral panic that surrounds it that makes it such a charged scary thing for so many people. That moral panic and the stigma and laws that force it underground are what makes it a dangerous, undesirable job for so many. Yes, trafficking is bad, but most sex workers don’t want or need to be rescued–except, quite often from law enforcement and the rescuers themselves.

I’m stunned at the way my understanding of both sex work and myself has changed just lately. I honestly don’t know what this will mean for my blog and my clips. I’ll keep making them, that’s for sure. Maybe now that I’m thinking about it more clearly, with fewer delusions and less confusion, I’ll do more, and do better. I don’t know; we’ll see. Like I said, these are new thoughts for me. I’m not really sure where they’ll take me.

If you do want to read some clever people with deeper, better developed and clearer thoughts about sex work here are a few places you can start.

Rikochan reclining

I give good hand, too, I’m told.

Books by People Who Know Much More About Sex Work Than I Do

Of course, there are thousands—millions—of sex workers out there who know more about sex work than I do, from the escorts, to the pornstars, to the strippers, to the clip makers like me, to the dominatrixes, to the sex bloggers, to the bodybuilding session girls (be still my heart) to the cam girls to the I don’t even know what. I could never hope to list them all! That would be another much bigger story. What I can do is give you a list of authors whose books on the subject have influenced, inspired, and educated me lately.

The first book I ever read about sex work was Naked Online: Hookups, Downloads, and Cashing in on Internet Sexploration, by Audacia Ray (@audaciaray on Twitter), a great writer who also did sex work. Even though it’s 10 years old now, it’s still a fascinating and inspiring (literally, to me) read. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, Ray’s book basically gave me the confidence to get started in online sex work. Even though I only got to go a few times, her readings series, The Red Umbrella Diaries, also introduced me to sex workers in person for the first time and showed me they were just regular people doing their jobs.

For a powerful, funny, heartbreaking, thoroughly unromanticized, yet also wildly romantic look at what it’s like to navigate relationships while being a sex worker, you should read the amazing book Prostitute Laundry by equally amazing Charlotte Shane (@charoshane on Twitter) based on her own confessional Tiny Letter about her life as a sex worker.

For an fascinating, unsentimental view of the lives of the migrant sex workers, the novel The Three Headed Dog is a great read that is free of the usual moral panic from the so-called rescue industry. It’s by the brilliant academic Laura Agustín (@LauraAgustin on Twitter), whose important book scholarly book on the subject Sex at the Margins: Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry. I am now slowly making my way through. Slowly because I’m a slow reader, not because it’s a slow book!

For a very clear-headed examination of what it means to be a sex worker, and above all how to do it without losing yourself, the new book Thriving in Sex Work: Heartfelt Advice for Staying Sane in the Sex Industry. It’s by an amazingly positive and uplifting woman who lived the life, Lola Davina (@Lola_Davina on Twitter)

For an incredibly funny but also very informative and incisive look at the stripping side of sex work the fabulous Jacqueline Frances (@JacqTheStripper on Twitter) has a great novel called The Beaver Show, the Crass and Inspiring Saga of an Enterprising Megababe, as well as a book of excellent cartoons called Striptastic! A Celebration of Dope-Ass Cunts Who Like Money. Someday I will see her onstage, whether it’s stripping or doing standup!

I don’t know if this post will make sense to anyone but me. But I hope it does. I hope at the very least a few people will click the links and discover some new books that give them a new view on Sex Work. There are so many great books on the subject. If you have a favorite or a suggestion for me, please let me know in the comments.

~Riko

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